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For seven months back in 1918 during World War I, the United States had Daylight Saving Time, something Germany had been doing for two years (and, little known, some places in Canada tried it in 1908). The idea back then was to minimize the use of artificial light during the war.

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Two robins, either lost, unable to tell when the seasons change, or more hardy than their brethren, appeared in my back yard on Friday morning last week and were still there a day later, searching for food. They were gone on Sunday when those gusty winds took over the landscape and made driv…

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I sat there for two hours last Sunday might, mesmerized as NBC brought to television one of the best music programs I have ever seen. It was a 50th anniversary show of the 1968 comeback special of a leather-clad Elvis Presley.

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A recent remodeling of the McDonald's restaurant in Princeton prompted a question from someone about how long the restaurant had been in town. I took a look and found that it was 25 years ago. 

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Many years ago a few of us, most of them much younger than me, were sitting around relating our stories of Minnesota winters. When it came my turn the first time, I brought up a winter from the early 1950s in a small town in southwestern Minnesota.

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Remember penny postcards? Remember when we had air mail stamps that you used when you wanted to get a letter to California or New York a little faster? Heck, remember when a first class stamp cost only 15 cents just 40 years ago?

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I was listening to WCCO Radio the other day, a station I have listened to for nearly 70 years and a station I enjoy, when the hosts that were on at that time made an assumption that lots of people make, as did the hosts the night before.

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If my time enlisted in the U.S. Army has taught me anything, it is two things: The first is that you should expect to get comfortable at being uncomfortable. The Army trains its soldiers to endure difficult circumstances in stressful environments all while maintaining military bearings.

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A recent documentary on Mao Zedong’s communist China era re-education camps called, “Dead Souls,” has just been released. It is well worth watching. It is a story Americans could learn from, especially today.

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“Feeling like you are sitting in a long, slow and often completely stopped traffic jam, going nowhere.” That’s the kind of frustration Dr. Julia Roberts, a Kentucky University professor, recently cited to help explain what many gifted and talented students feel as they sit in class.

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I've done many columns in past years that listed things I hoped might get done in the New Year. Included were wishes for Princeton, the state of Minnesota, and the nation. One of those this Dec. 28, as 2019 nears, is that the president of the United States acts more a president, although tha…

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A few months back, I was writing about fall fashion trends. According to Harper’s Bazaar, classic patterns such as herringbone and houndstooth were in. They even anticipated a return to 1980s fashion, with lots of leather and padded shoulders. While I have seen some thigh-high boots as they …

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When knee-high bushes that line the sidewalk to our home go up in flames, I’m blaming the Chinese.

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Trust is a powerful thing. Think about how many times a day you trust someone – many times a person you’ve never met – to protect you and keep you safe.

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Finally, someone mentioned the other day, Social Security is going to go up in 2019. What that person meant was that the COLA (cost-of-living-adjustment) for 2019 will be 2.8 percent, the largest raise in seven years. That will mean an average raise of $39 per person, or $468 a year. The est…

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Democrat Tim Walz, the next governor of Minnesota, had 1,393,057 votes (nearly 54 percent) as he beat Republican Jeff Johnson who had 1,097,700 votes (about 42 percent) in the Nov. 6 election. That's a margin of 295,357 votes.

Princeton celebrated as World War I ended 100 years ago; Veterans Day gives us a pause to remember Thursday night of this week, with heads bowed and hands over our hearts, we had a moment of silence near the end of thel ocal American Legion post's meeting as we remembered departed comrades. Then we closed the monthly meeting as we always do with the playing of "Taps," the music you hear at the close of a Memorial Day observance or a military funeral, and held our salute until the final note had sounded. Some might consider that a bit corny but for Legion members it's a time to remember those who served and are no longer with us. When I joined the Legion 52 years ago it was the beginning of a time when we were losing veterans of World War I. Now we no longer have a World War II veteran left in our group, there are only a few Korean War vets left from a war that ended 65 years ago, and we're regularly losing veterans of the war in Vietnam that ended 43 years ago. Today (Friday) there were Veterans Day programs at both the high school and intermediate schools in Princeton, the high school holding a program the last couple years similar to the one that has been held for many years at the intermediate school with Marine veteran Jim Dalziel as the driving force. Students in those schools were respectful as they learned more about veterans who served their country. And on Sunday it will be a special time as we remember Veterans Day, originally called Armistice Day until it was changed in 1954 after the Korean War. It was on Nov. 11, 1918, 100 years ago at 11 a.m. on the 11th day of the 11th month, that a war then called the "war to end all wars" came to an end in Marshall Foch's Paris railroad car. It came at the price of 112,000 American lives even though the United States stayed out of the war for two and a half of its four years. R. C. Dunn, the editor of the Princeton Union on that November day in 1918, wrote: "Monday was a gala day in Princeton. Having made sure that the war had ended — that the story flashed over the wire was not another fake — the word went forth to close the stores and "let 'er go," and the celebration which followed beggared description." You can read a longer version of what went on that day in the Memory Lane feature of this week's Union-Times. An improvised band that included drums, horns, tin cans, whistles, cowbells and circular saws, marched toward the railroad depot with kids and adults joining the parade. That afternoon there was a program at the intersection where the downtown signal lights are today. It included speakers and a choir. "Crowds of people remained on the street until late at night," editor Dunn wrote. "Princeton had never seen such a day before."' We can only imagine the joy those people felt. Today it would be a major television and social media event. But back then the word came over teletypes and was spread from house to house, down the alley and around town. I don't know how eloquent the speakers were that day in Princeton but I'm sure the words were heartfelt. As I think about veterans on this upcoming Veterans Day 100 years later, I'm reminded of the eloquence of General Douglas MacArthur when he made a farewell speech at his beloved West Point in 1962. He used the academy's motto of "Duty, Honor, Country" as his text. Some may say he was romanticizing war. But it's worth listening as he speaks of those who served. He called the American man-at-arms the noblest figure in the world. "When I think of his patience in adversity, his courage under fire, and his modesty in victory, I am filled with an emotion of admiration," the general told cadets. "He belongs to history as furnishing one of the greatest examples of successful patriotism . . . In twenty campaigns, on a hundred battlefields, around a thousand campfires, I have witnessed that enduring fortitude . . . and that invincible determination which have carved his statue in the hearts of his people . . . I can see those staggering columns of the First World War, bending under soggy packs on many a weary march, from dripping dusk to drizzling dawn, slogging ankle deep through the mire of shell-pocked roads; to form grimly for the attack, blue-lipped, covered with sludge and mud, chilled by the wind and rain, driving home to their objective, and for many, to the judgment seat of God." MacArthur knew he was in the last part of his life. His final lines made that clear. "The shadows are lengthening for me. The twilight's here. My days of old have vanished . . . they have gone glimmering through the dreams of things that were. Their memory is one of wondrous beauty, watered by tears and coaxed and caressed by the smiles of yesterday. I listen vainly, but with thirsty ear, for the witching melody of faint bugles blowing reveille, of far drums beating the long roll. In my dreams I hear again the crash of guns, the rattle of musketry, the strange mournful mutter of the battlefield . . . today marks my final roll call with you. But I want you to know that when I cross the river my last conscious thoughts will be of the Corps, and the Corps, and the Corps. I bid you farewell." Two years later, as he was near death, he begged President Lyndon Johnson to get the U.S. out of Vietnam, correctly guessing the tragedy that would follow, just as President Dwight Eisenhower knew bad times were ahead in 1960 when he asked for a reduction in arms as he left office. Those two old generals had endured far more than we can know, sending men into battle with the knowledge that many would die. MacArthur, in that West Point speech, touched on his feelings for the American soldier, feelings that we should pass on to our children, and their children, so they know what those who have served have done to allow us to live in the kind of country we have. "I do not know the dignity of their birth," he said, " but I do know the glory of their death. They died, unquestioning, uncomplaining, with faith in their hearts, and on their lips the hope that we would go on to victory." Sadly, the armistice that we remember 100 years later — while it ended that war that was to be the one to end all wars — has been followed by many other wars. But on Veterans Day this Sunday it will still be a good time to remember those who have served, as well as those serving today. It's not a bad idea to let veterans know you appreciate what they have done. Veterans Day specials for vets Eleven years ago the Applebee's restaurant chain began serving free meals to veterans on Veterans Day. They've served 8.9 million meals since then and are shooting for 1 million this year. Veterans can stop at any Applebee's for a free lunch or dinner on Sunday. Locally the Coborn's store has served free chicken dinners for vets on Veterans Day for a few years and they're doing it again this year on Monday, Nov.12, from 11 a.m to 7 p.m. A guest of the veteran is eligible to receive a half-price dinner. Texas Roadhouse in Waite Park is serving a free lunch for vets from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Sunday. And if you're in Bloomington, Minn., on Sunday, Chili's is also serving a free meal for veterans. Other restaurant chains also have Veterans Day free meals. NEXT WEEK: Some thoughts about this week's election. SPORTS SHORTS The death a few days ago of former Minnesota running back Bill Brown at age 80 reminded me of an unusual nickname for a whole backfield in the'60s. It was the 10-20-30 backfield. Hall of Fame quarterback Fran Tarkenton was No. 10. Tommy Mason, the No. 1 overall pick in the 1961 NFL draft who made the Pro Bowl three times, was No. 20, and Brown was No. 30. Brown, four times named to the Pro Bowl, was the fullback and Mason the halfback. Called by some "the toughest guy ever to play in the NFL," Brown played with the Vikings for 13 years and was in the Pro Bowl four times. With Tarkenton's nine Pro Bowl appearances added, the three totaled 16 appearances in the Pro Bowl. Brown was one of the first backs in the NFL to be used regularly in the passing game . . . We'll have time next week for some of the stats from the girls tennis team's season. For now, a couple things stood out at the team's banquet earlier this week. One is that the program has won the conference title six times in the last seven years, five of those in the Mississippi 8 and one in the Granite Ridge. And, as usual, the team GPA of 3.71 qualified it for the Gold Star Award handed out by the state coaches association. There were eight on the team who made academic all-conference and four (only seniors are eligible) who qualified for the All-State Academic team: Kailyn Paulson, Aurora Schossow, Gabby Dahlen and Kelsey Dorr . . . Remember Cordarelle Patterson, the Viking kick returner/receiver that Coach Mike Zimmer had no use for? He's been with the New England Patriots this year and has seen action the last two weeks as, of all things, a running back because of injuries. Playing against the Packers last Sunday he had 61 yards in 11 carries (5.5 average), caught a pass for 7 yards and scored a rushing touchdown. In his career he has six touchdowns on kickoff returns (averaging 30.3 on 167 returns), 7 rushing touchdowns and 9 as a receiver. I've seen him run very hard the last two weeks as a running back. Zimmer didn't like him but I think he could help the team. Another former Viking having a good year is 33-year-old Adrian Peterson. He's run for 604 yards with a 4.4 average and 4 touchdowns. He'a also caught 12 passes for an average of 13.9 yards, and a touchdown. The Vikings always said he couldn't be much help in the passing game and he averaged only 8.1 yards a reception with them. Looks like the Redskins are using him better than Minnesota did, even though he's older. . . .The football teams in the Mississippi 8 had a combined record under. 500 this season. True, there's no longer a M8 football conference, and teams in the M8 appeared to be down. But, two have made the state tournament, one improbably. Cambridge (7-3) had a resurgence this season and capped it off with a 34-20 win over Andover for the Section 7 5A title and will play Bemidji (9-1) at 8 p.m. Saturday in St. Cloud. The 'Jackets had struggled in recent years but. after a three-game losing streak in the middle of the season, including a one-point loss to Andover and a 70-42 loss to the high-powered Buffalo team, beat Elk River (9-1) 48-44 for the Elks' only loss of the season. Elk River is also in the state tournament. St. Michael-Albertville (7-3) which opted to go up to Class 6A a couple years ago, plays undefeated Lakeville North this Friday at 7 p.m. in Eagan after scoring 29 points in the final seven minutes for a 29-28 win over Edina, a rally that got some national attention. Trailing 28-0, the Knights scored a touchdown with 6:32 remaining and then recovered three straight onside kicks and scored at 5:00, 4:12 and 1:31, including a two-point conversion after the third touchdown and successful PAT kicks after the other three. A Knight interception with 1:09 left sealed the deal. I've never heard of a comeback like that . . . One other prep highlight: Jason Williamson of Owatonna, a back I saw play against Brainerd at state last season, ran for 477 yards and 6 touchdowns in a 49-25 win over Northfield for the Section 1 5A title. That's a state record. Williamson, headed for the University of Minnesota, ran for 441 yards and 8 touchdowns in his team's semifinal win. That's 14 touchdowns and 918 yards the last two games . . . A few weeks ago I noted the accomplishments of former M8 players on college football teams. One of them was former PHS player Tanner Palmborg, a senior walk-on at North Dakota University, and this week's Union-Times has a story about him suffering a torn ACL but not missing a game as a starting linebacker, with the aid of a knee brace. That's remarkable. So are the accomplishments of three others. John Solberg is a junior from Cambridge who leads St. Cloud State in receiving after being a high school quarterback. He had a 41-yard touchdown reception against Minot State last Saturday as the Huskies upped their record to 7-3 and has 46 receptions for 671 yards (14.6 average) and 7 touchdowns. Will Gillich, a wide receiver from Chisago Lakes, leads the St. John's team (9-0) in receiving with 45 catches, in yards with 808 (18.0 average), and touchdowns with 9. He has thrown one pass and it went for a 79-yard touchdown. He also has five carries for 27 yards (5.2 average). The Johnnies have won the MIAC title. Another Chisago Lakes product, senior Josh Parks, leads St. Thomas (8-1, the only loss to St. John's) in touchdowns with 17 and in rushing with 1,259 yards and a lofty 9.2 average per carry on a team averaging about 54 points a game. There are others from the M8 playing in college who are having good seasons . . . And then we have the Vikings and the Gophers — but I guess that can wait to next week after Gophers upset Purdue. SPORTS MEMORIES Nov. 14, 1963 - Bowling in the Kenby Lanes Tuesday league, Al Lueck had the high series of 646 but Bill Enger (238) had the high game. HIgh series for the week by a woman was a 513 by Janice Guimont. There were leagues at both Kenby Lanes and Princeton Recreation (Frank's bar where the VFW is now.) Nov. 20, 1968 - The PHS basketball team (boys only back then) was to open against Foley. The schedule listed JV games at 6:30 and varsity games at 8, with admission 50 cents for students and 75 cents for adults. Nov. 15, 1973 - Making all-conference in football for the PHS title team were Dave Cook, Don Snow, Mike Solheim, Mike Froelich, Keith Julson and Tom Rogde. Rogde led the league in punting and tied for first in interceptions. Froelich was second in rushing. Nov.15, 1978 - Dave Blaske, Dan Patten and Don Peterson were all-conference in football. Blaske, a junior who ran for 1,422 yards and scored 88 points, was the third in his family to make all-conference at running back. Blaske, Tim Dunn and Todd Knutson were chosen captains for the 1979 season. Nov. 17, 1983 - The girls swim team placed 10th in the region meet as Kelly Keen and Mary Beth Sauer each had a fifth . . . The nine-team city basketball league, expanded because of an over-30 group, began the season and Dan Peterson scored 23 points for Vic's Refrigeration. Nov. 17, 1988 - Chad Keen and Craig Talberg were all-conference in football . . . The hockey and girls basketball teams both went into the season looking for their fifth straight Rum River Conference titles . . . The girls swim team placed 11th in the section. Nov. 18, 1993 - All-conference in football were Jason Hartman, John Marma, Jeremy Snow, Derrick Thiel and Jeremy Werner . . . Jenny Cartwright was named MVP in tennis . . . Nikki Noaeill broke a school record in the 50-yard freestyle and placed eighth in the section. Sara Clow was seventh in diving, Princeton's best finish. Nov. 12, 1998 - Girls hockey, in its finitial season, was set to open the season on Nov. 10 at Cambridge, also in its first year. The first home game was to be two days later vs. Minnehaha Academy. Nov. 13, 2003 - Princeton won the battle of statistics but Sauk Rapids beat Princeton 29-25 in a state quarterfinal game that Princeton led 19-8 at with 4:16 left in the first half. Sauk Rapids made it 19-12 in the 14-degree weather with 1:06 left in the half. Princeton drove to the Sauk Rapids 7 but the Princeton quarterback was hit while passing and an interception was run back 85 yards and the Storm led 22-19 at halftime. A fake punt by the Tigers failed in the second half at the Sauk Rapids 38 and a field goal try failed when the snap was fumbled. Nov. 13, 2008 - Seventeen on the 34-girl roster qualified for the section swimming meet. in Grand Rapids. Nov.14, 2013 - Montana Lawrence led the swim team with a sixth and a seventh at the section swim meet . . . Former PHS player Phil Klaphake became the first St. Cloud State quarterback to throw for more than 9,000 yards and rush for more than 2,000. Nov. 16, 2017 - The PHS bowling team placed second among four teams in the Metro North Conference competition in Rush City. Joe Meyer and Bryce Keykal were all-conference. Dorr is the former editor of the Princeton Eagle (2 years) and Princeton Union-Eagle (31 years), and has covered sports in the Princeton area for 51 years.   .

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Election Day 2018 is almost here. Hallelujah — the shouting, name-calling and the maddening “I’m so-and-so and I approved this message” will cease. I will gladly welcome back the commercials for pharmaceuticals and their endless list of potential side effects. We can again become Facebook fr…

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The plan this week was to do a piece on Historic Santiago (as a sign in downtown Santiago proclaims), a small community in Sherburne County located about 14 miles east of Princeton. But lots of things - nice weather which meant outside work, the state tennis tournament, an annual dinner with…

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I finally gave in a few days ago and turned up the thermostat, pushing heat through the house for the first time this fall after all those days of temperatures in the 40s that included day after day of rain. The wind was whistling outside, causing a few early leaves to drift downward, but it…

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In the world of education the term student achievement generally refers to performance in reading, math, and science. The primary reason for tracking these academic areas are for Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) accountability purposes. I am happy to say that in Princeton our mission to be …

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It was March of 1996 and I was sitting in the stands at Port Charlotte, Fla., as the Minnesota Twins and Texas Rangers prepared to do battle on a typical sun-splashed afternoon in the Sunshine State. My ticket was right behind the Minnesota dugout, courtesy of a Ranger fan who had an extra o…

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I voted early in the upcoming general election during the noon hour of Sept. 24 at Bloomington City Hall — 42 days before Election Day, Nov. 6.

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St. Cloud State was were I chose to go to college. It was a great school, it was close to home, and my friends were going there too. The 30-minute drive was perfect; far enough but close enough also. I had my roommates, Lloyd Olson, Vern Bloom and Ted Edin to share our basement apartment wit…

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I looked at the digital clock in my car Wednesday afternoon as it read 1:16 and, like a good, responsible driver, pulled over to the side of the road. I opened the glove compartment, pulled my cell phone out, and waited for the message that was coming from the Wireless Emergency Alert system…

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By the middle of the second quarter of  last Sunday's stunning 27-6 loss by the Minnesota Vikings to the previously-hapless Buffalo Bills, I was wishing I owned the No-Doz concession at US Bank Stadium.  Some seats were already empty then and by the middle of the third quarter many seats wer…

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Hello, folks. Who doesn’t love October? My favorite month brings cool weather, changing leaves, Halloween candy, and the ECRL Reads program. So between taking family trips to the pumpkin patch, hanging up Halloween decorations, and raking leaves, remember to stop into the library, pick up yo…

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I read a daily paper every day, sometimes two, and there are always things that surprise me. And I quite regularly disagree with things on the editorial pages, although I find myself agreeing with some opinions that I might not have previously. Read on.

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As Minnesota students return to school, for most families, the key questions involve their own youngsters. Will they be encouraged and challenged? Will they be safe? Will their individual needs be identified and met?

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This week I will be introducing the “No Shame-No Blame Act of 2018” to make the despicable practice of “lunch shaming” illegal.

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As I look from my kitchen window to the northeast I see kids streaming into one of my city’s high schools. As I look to the northwest, I see more kids streaming into a middle school and elementary school.

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My name is Jason Senne and I grew up in Glenville., a small Minnesota town near Iowa border. I grew up playing a variety of sports and showing horses throughout the Midwest. In high school I participated in football, wrestling, baseball, dramas and student council.

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I had just read Sen. John McCain’s farewell letter that was released upon his death. It struck me as something every citizen in our country needs to carefully read and meditate on. He represented the best of American politicians and the best of America. He stood against political extremism, …

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Fans of the Minnesota Twins would normally have been jumping for joy this Friday morning because Eddie Rosario and Miguel Sano are expected to return to the lineup tonight after suffering minor injuries. Instead, some of those fans may be watching something else in TV or wondering why they s…