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As Stillwater’s population increased during the early 20th century, new, modern schools were needed to be constructed. In 1938 several older schools, such as the Lincoln and Central Schools were closed and new ones constructed. One new school named Washington was built on the North Hill on M…

Additional Stories

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Beer, whisky and soda pop were manufactured in Stillwater during the 19th century. The breweries in Stillwater are well known, Wolf’s, Aiple and Knipps, but there were other beverages that were produced and consumed in the St. Croix Valley. Some include mineral water, soda and ginger ale. On…

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Thousands of Minnesota high school students may want to thank Cole Stevens, Hayat Muse and Lincoln Bacal. They, along with Youthprise, a Minnesota nonprofit, are suing the state of Minnesota. Their case asserts the Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development is misinterpretin…

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I don’t know about you, but I am struggling to keep up with this political circus. As far as I can tell, there are far more than three rings of activity under the Big Top and a concerning amount of frozen-faced clowns. I am growing tired of the daily cannon explosion and am beginning to thin…

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One of the most challenging parts of a new organization is to figure out your mission. The excitement of the new organization brings a lot of ideas and there can be “push and pull” on the direction that the group wants to go. When the Washington County Historical Society was organized in 193…

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Yes, we have officially passed from “Summer” into “Fall.” Are you ready? For most of us, it takes a while to make that transition. Fortunately, there are neighbors that try to help us with that psychological change.

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Many of the early groceries in Stillwater were connected to the lumber companies. Since most of these companies paid the workers in “company script” or money that could only be used in the company store, that is where the workers went to do their shopping. Such companies as Hersey, Bean &…

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We’ve entered the glory days of fall, when it’s cool enough to put on a pair of jeans and tromp though piles of crunchy leaves, but still warm enough to spend the day outside in your favorite park without getting frozen toes. Golden leaves tumble from the sky when the breezes blow and asters…

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Our daughter turned 13 last week and my husband has been calling her a “Baker’s Dozen” since she blew out the candles. “I think that translates into 13 birthday cakes,” she said coolly. “And that nickname is going to have to stop.” (Enter: eye roll).

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We did it! Perhaps you joined me this past week in drawing a long sigh of relief. Beginning a new school year in the midst of a pandemic has proven to be a very stressful endeavor for district staff, as well as for our students and families.

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Who am I? I work hard for you but don’t get enough love from folks. My job isn’t at all glamorous, but it’s really important; especially in a city like Stillwater where people enjoy the water in our lovely St. Croix River, Brown’s Creek and local lakes.

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Every year, there are corn fields and mazes that entice you to come see their crops before they are harvested. They are fun places to educate children and adults.

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When a convicted criminal is sentenced to life in prison, sometimes, depending where the court is located, that could mean as little as seven years or maybe as many as 30 years, rarely does it actually mean the rest of the convicts life.

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For the past six months, Valley Access Channels in Stillwater has sponsored a series of cable programs about COVID-19 and its impact on our local communities. The series, entitled, “COVID-19: Recovery in the Valley,” recently focused on how our school district is responding to the pandemic f…

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September’s full moon came early this year. The Anishnaabe call it manoominike-giizis, the Rice Moon, when it is time to harvest the wild rice. Looking out the window before sunup, we watched in awe as the moon peeked through low clouds.

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I noticed it first two weeks ago. At 5 p.m., on Long Lake, about 12 geese started squawking and then took off from the lake. Then, about 15 minutes later, and again at 5:30, 5:45 and 6 p.m. another group that gathered would leave the lake. I didn’t think very much of it the first couple days…

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As the pandemic grinds on, our choices affect how much risk we take. A Sunday drive showed some choices people are making. The breezy walk/biking path across the river bridge is a favorite for people from all over the Twin Cities. 

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For the past five months, Valley Access Channels (VAC) has sponsored a series of cable programs about COVID-19 and its impact on our local communities. The series, entitled, “COVID-19: Recovery in the Valley,” recently focused on local governments’ response to the pandemic. Marguerite “Margo…

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After five decades of life, I’m quite certain there are alien beings among us. I’ve personally never seen them, but that’s why I’m so convinced they are here. Any life form advanced enough to be here, most likely having arrived from a distant galaxy, is certainly clever enough to do so witho…

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If you’re like me, you’re constantly fighting belly bulge. However, I’m excited about the new Big Belly trash and recycle bins that Stillwater has brought in to help fight overflowing refuse bins.

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Since March, Valley Access Channels (VAC) has been hosting a series of cable programs on COVID-19 and its impact on our community. Marguerite “Margot” Rheinberger, a Stillwater native who holds an advanced degree in public health, has been the series host. The most recent program, entitled, …

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“Since April, we’re been inundated with cases of teenagers who had been doing fine before COVID 19. Their parent(s) report that the teens suddenly could not sleep at night, lost their appetite, were cutting themselves, and had suicidal thoughts. Personalities changed, teenagers become irrita…

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When it comes to Christopher Columbus, he indeed landed in the Bahamas on Oct. 12, 1492, in the first documented arrival of Europeans to North American soil.

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We all experience it, even if we don’t want to admit it: loneliness. Especially during this period of self-isolation to protect our physical well-being, we put ourselves at risk as we reduce our social connections.

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During the winter months, most folks get excited when I tell them the temperature will warm above average. Of course, we love our heat around here, but is there a point where it gets too hot for you?

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Coming of age in the late 1960s and early 1970s was fraught with challenges. Protests raged across the nation because of the unpopular war. Riots tore through our cities over racial inequities. College campuses roiled in discontent. Destruction was everywhere, it seemed. We mourned the death…

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Adapting is something we older adults have figured out how to do. Let’s face it: life demands that we go along with changes that are out of our control. Fighting changes that are thrust upon us just uses up the energy that could go toward the more productive response of adapting.

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On my last day of high school, a piglet went blazing through our hallways with a trail of squealing, emotionally charged high school seniors in its wake.

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I like to ride my bike. Fast. If you see me pedal by while you’re on a ride of your own, I’ll pretend that I don’t see you as I spin the crank just a little bit faster to be sure that I stay in the lead. Yes, we’re racing. No, you aren’t going to win.

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No question we’ve been handed bushels full of lemons this spring. Between staying at home as much as possible and worrying about the global pandemic, we have hit upon a sour note.

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Curbside pickup, checkout splatter screens, and … bikes. The cultural fallout of the pandemic is underway and one of the most surprising trends is the elevation of the lowly bicycle as a preferred form of transportation.

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We have been living – some might say trapped - in a sort of “twilight zone,” where the end felt indefinite. But recent glimmers of hope keep showing and increasing. For family friends and obvious extroverts, Margot Rheinberger and Louisa Westrup, both Gazette columnists, their personas have …

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During this turbulent time, it can be difficult to maintain positivity and have hope for the future. While we continue to practice social distancing to protect the health of our communities and ourselves, many of us are feeling lonely and missing our loved ones. Missing human contact is norm…